Sibling Staff at West

Michelle Lozano, Sports Editor

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Siblings are seen throughout Joliet West High School every day.  When it comes to JT staff, the same applies.  There are many pairs of siblings in which students talk to everyday, and most of them don’t even realize it. Mr. and Ms. Yaklich, Mrs. Guseman and Dean Narducci, Mrs. Cimino and Ms. Fox, Ms. Lingafelter and Ms. Lingafelter, are all siblings that see each other at work every day.

Since most of the siblings are staff members that interact with students, one might wonder what kind of questions are asked when the connection is made of their relationship. Ms. Fox, Head Poms Coach and teacher gets asked whether her and her sister, Mrs. Cimino, have the same mother and father. “Yes, we do have the same parents,” Fox assured. “Students are surprised we are related,” added Mrs. Cimino, “We look and act nothing alike.”

The staff shares a few thoughts as well concerning the subject. “I do not think a lot of staff really knew we are siblings since we have different last names,” Ms. Guseman stated about her brother, Dean Narducci, “but there is usually a look of surprise when staff members find out.” The opposite effect is the case with Mr. and Ms. Yaklich. “Most students and staff pick up on the last name right away and follow with “Are you related to Coach/Mr. Yaklich?” Ms. Yaklich stated.

When asked, there were very few siblings that have come across any negatives of working in the same facility as the other—most aspects were positive. Both Ms. Fox and Mrs. Cimino agree that a positive to having a sibling at work is that you have someone to talk to that you trust. “If I have any questions, I can always call her to get some answers,” Ms. Fox stated, “I can also share my friends like Mrs. Walton with her.” Ms. Yaklich added, “I think that there is no one better to receive advice from than my brother.”

One could imagine that the workplace also goes outside of the West building and into the homes of the siblings’ when reunited. “We talk about work outside of the school as other siblings would,” Ms. Guseman stated, “but it does eventually get annoying to my husband and his wife so we try and keep it to a minimum.” Dean Narducci, almost exactly quoting his sister, stated, “We try to keep that to a minimum seeing as our better halves tend to get annoyed by those conversations, but it is nice to have someone to talk with that helps me see things from a different perspective.”

Overall, the sibling experience within the staff is much different than what a student might think. There are more positives than negatives, and they go to each other for advice. Simply stated, it must be a good relationship when you can put up with your brother or sister anywhere, even at work.

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